Exploring the Effect of Adding an Interactive Lecture to a Standardized Patient Curriculum on the Attitudes of Third-Year Medical Students About Patients With Obesity: A Quasi-Experimental Study

E. Grunvald, J. Wei, T. Lin, K. Yang, X. M. Tu, O. Lunde, E. Ross, J. Cheng, J. DeConde, N. Farber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Anti-obesity bias is pervasive among medical professionals, students, and trainees. Stigmatization of patients leads to suboptimal care and clinical outcomes. Educational strategies in medical training are needed to reverse these attitudes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an innovative didactic intervention and a standardized patient (SP) exercise on attitudes towards patients with obesity among medical students. METHODS: In 2016, a quasi-experimental study design was used at a US medical school. The class was divided into 2 groups according to a pre-determined protocol based on their clinical schedule, one assessed after exposure to a SP group and the other after exposure to the SP and an interactive lecture (IL + SP group) with real patients. The Attitudes about Treating Patients with Obesity and The Perceived Causes of Obesity questionnaires measured changes in several domains. A generalized estimating equations model was used to estimate the effect of the interventions both within and between groups. RESULTS: Both groups showed improvements in negative and positive attitudes, although the reduction in scores for the negative attitude domain did not reach statistical significance in the IL + SP group (for the SP group, P = .01 and  
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)23821205231207683
JournalJ Med Educ Curric Dev
Volume10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2023

Keywords

  • Obesity attitudes bias curriculum education medical students

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