Educating the next generation of cancer researchers: Evaluation of a cancer research partnership training program

Lin Zhu, S. J. Dodd, Yuku Chen, Emily R. Kaminsky, Zhiqing Elaine Liu, Grace X. Ma, Olorunseun O. Ogunwobi, Carolyn Y. Fang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

African American, American Indian and Alaska Native, Hispanic (or Latinx), Native Hawaiian, and other Pacific Islander groups are underrepresented in the biomedical workforce, which is one of the barriers to addressing cancer disparities among minority populations. The creation of a more inclusive biomedical workforce dedicated to reducing the burden of cancer health disparities requires structured, mentored research and cancer-related research exposure during the earlier stages of training. The Summer Cancer Research Institute (SCRI) is a multicomponent 8-week intensive summer program funded under the Partnership between a Minority Serving Institute and a National Institutes of Health-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center. In this survey study, we found that students who participated in the SCRI Program reported greater knowledge and interest in pursuing careers in cancer-related fields than their counterparts who did not participate in SCRI. Successes, challenges, and solutions in providing training in cancer and cancer health disparities research to improve diversity in the biomedical fields were also discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0286279
Pages (from-to)e0286279
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume18
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 4 2023

Keywords

  • Biomedical Research/education
  • Hawaii
  • Humans
  • Mentors
  • Minority Groups/education
  • Neoplasms/therapy
  • Workforce

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