Assessing Physicians’ Recommendations for Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Testing Among Minority Populations in Greater Philadelphia and New York City

Thoin F. Begum, Vidya S Patil, Lin Zhu, Ming-Chin Yeh, Evelyn González, Marilyn A Fraser, Wenyue Lu, Steven Zhu, Nathaly Rubio-Torio, Grace X. Ma, Yin Tan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Deaths from liver cancer are on the rise and disproportionately affect minority racial/ethnic groups. In this study, we examined associations between physicians’ recommendations for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) screening and sociodemographic and lifestyle factors among minority populations in the areas of Greater Philadelphia and New York City. Using Poisson regression with robust variance estimation, we evaluated potential associations for 576 Hispanic American (HA), African American (AA), and Asian Pacific American (APA) adults, using blood tests as an outcome measure, with adjustment for sociodemographic factors We found that APAs (34.2%) were most likely to have a physician recommend HBV and HCV screening tests (34.2% and 27.1%, respectively), while HAs were least likely to receive an HBV recommendation (15.0%) and AAs were least likely to receive an HCV recommendation (15.3%). HAs were significantly likely to have never received a blood test for either HBV or HCV (RR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.49). APAs were significantly more likely to receive a screening recommendation for HBV (RR = 1.10, 95%CI: 1.01, 1.20) and to have a blood test (RR = 1.57, 95% CI: 1.06, 2.33). Our findings show that, among HAs, AAs, and APAs, physician recommendations are strongly associated with patients undergoing blood tests for HBV and HCV and that minority populations should increasingly be recommended to screen for HBV and HCV, especially given their elevated risk.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Community Health
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 29 2024

Keywords

  • Cancer Epidemiology
  • Disparities
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis C
  • Liver cancer
  • Minority race/ethnicity

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